Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.929 IF 2.929
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 3.368 IF 5-year
    3.368
  • SNIP value: 1.413 SNIP 1.413
  • IPP value: 3.069 IPP 3.069
  • SJR value: 1.853 SJR 1.853
  • h5-index value: 44 h5-index 44
AMT cover
Executive editors:
Thomas
 
Wagner
,
Hartwig
 
Harder
Joanna
 
Joiner
Paolo
 
Laj
 &
Andreas
 
Richter

Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of advances in remote sensing, as well as in situ and laboratory measurement techniques for the constituents and properties of the Earth's atmosphere.

The main subject areas comprise the development, intercomparison, and validation of measurement instruments and techniques of data processing and information retrieval for gases, aerosols, and clouds. The manuscript types considered for peer-reviewed publication are research articles, review articles, and commentaries.

News

Institutional agreement for AMT authors affiliated with the Leibniz Universität Hannover

11 Jan 2016

Copernicus Publications and the Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) in Hanover, Germany have signed an agreement on central billing of article processing charges.

AMT awarded DOAJ Seal

16 Dec 2015

Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT) has received the new DOAJ Seal which recognizes journals with an exceptionally high level of publishing standards and best practice.

Workflow of AMT reorganized

10 Dec 2015

We have summarized the upcoming changes to AMT by the end of the year.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

We describe an innovative instrument based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy that analyzes the stable isotopes of methane in the ambient atmosphere. This instrument was used to study atmospheric emissions from oil and gas extraction activities in the Uintah Basin in Utah. These measurements suggest that 85 ± 7% of the total emissions in the basin are from natural gas production. The easy field deployment of this instrument can enable similar regional attribution studies across the world.

C.W. Rella, J. Hoffnagle, Y. He, and S. Tajima

This paper describes the feasibility of using a differential absorption radar technique for the remote sensing of water vapor within clouds near the Earth surface from a spaceborne platform. The proposed methodology is shown to be theoretically achievable and complimentary to existing water vapor remote sensing methods.

M. D. Lebsock, K. Suzuki, L. F. Millan, and P. M. Kalmus

The CCA algorithm is applicable to any modern passive microwave radiometer on board polar orbiting satellites; it has been developed using a data set of co-located SSMIS and TRMM-PR measurements and AMSU-MHS and TRMM-PR measurements. The algorithm shows a small rate of false alarms and superior detection capability and can efficiently detect (POD between 0.55 and 0.71) minimum rain rate varying from 0.14 mm/h (AMSU over ocean) to 0.41 (SSMIS over coast).

D. Casella, G. Panegrossi, P. Sanò, L. Milani, M. Petracca, and S. Dietrich

This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 radiometers accuracy and sources of uncertainty, drawing on laboratory experiments, numerical modelling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the art measurements.

J. Badosa, J. Wood, P. Blanc, C. N. Long, L. Vuilleumier, D. Demengel, and M. Haeffelin

The difference due to the content of a priori information between a constrained retrieval and the true atmospheric state is usually represented by a diagnostic quantity called smoothing error. In this paper it is shown that the concept of the smoothing error as a component of the retrieval error budget is questionable because it is not compliant with Gaussian error propagation.

T. von Clarmann

Publications Copernicus