Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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  • IF value: 3.089 IF 3.089
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 3.700 IF 5-year
    3.700
  • CiteScore<br/> value: 3.59 CiteScore
    3.59
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  • SJR value: 2.026 SJR 2.026
  • IPP value: 3.082 IPP 3.082
  • h5-index value: 45 h5-index 45
AMT cover
Executive editors:
Thomas
 
Wagner
,
Hartwig
 
Harder
,
Joanna
 
Joiner
,
Paolo
 
Laj
 &
Andreas
 
Richter
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of advances in remote sensing, as well as in situ and laboratory measurement techniques for the constituents and properties of the Earth's atmosphere.
The main subject areas comprise the development, intercomparison, and validation of measurement instruments and techniques of data processing and information retrieval for gases, aerosols, and clouds. Papers submitted to AMT must contain atmospheric measurements, laboratory measurements relevant for atmospheric science, and/or theoretical calculations of measurements simulations with detailed error analysis including instrument simulations. The manuscript types considered for peer-reviewed publication are research articles, review articles, and commentaries.
News
Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association 03 May 2018

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

AMT celebrates its 10th anniversary 06 Apr 2018

The EGU Publications Committee and the co-editors-in-chief will celebrate the 10th anniversary of AMT during an evening reception, open to all, at the EGU General Assembly 2018 in Vienna, taking place at the PICO spot 5a on Tuesday, 10 April at 19:00.

New article processing charges for AMT 05 Dec 2017

From 1 January 2018 Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT) will slightly increase the article processing charges.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

This work reports airborne wind lidar observations performed in a recent field campaign. The deployed lidar system serves as a demonstrator for the satellite instrument ALADIN on board Aeolus, which is scheduled for launch in 2018 and will become the first wind lidar in space. After presenting the measurement principle, operation procedures and wind retrieval algorithm, the obtained wind results are validated and discussed, providing valuable information in preparation for the satellite mission.

Oliver Lux, Christian Lemmerz, Fabian Weiler, Uwe Marksteiner, Benjamin Witschas, Stephan Rahm, Andreas Schäfler, and Oliver Reitebuch

Remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), commonly called UAVs, are used in atmospheric science for in situ measurements. The presented work shows wind measurements from a five-hole probe on an RPAS. Comparisons with other instruments (sonic anemometer and cloud radar) show good agreement, validating the RPAS measurements. In situ vertical wind measurements at cloud base are highlighted because they are a major parameter needed for simulating aerosol-cloud interactions, though rarely collected.

Radiance Calmer, Gregory C. Roberts, Jana Preissler, Kevin J. Sanchez, Solène Derrien, and Colin O'Dowd

Wind information throughout the middle-atmosphere is crucial for the understanding of atmospheric dynamics but became available only recently, thanks to developments in remote sensing and modelling approaches. We present the first thorough assessment of the quality of the wind estimates by comparing co-located observations from lidar and microwave radiometry and opposing them to the major atmospheric models. Moreover we evaluated a new approach for measuring mesopause region wind by radiometry.

Rolf Rüfenacht, Gerd Baumgarten, Jens Hildebrand, Franziska Schranz, Vivien Matthias, Gunter Stober, Franz-Josef Lübken, and Niklaus Kämpfer

Tropical atmospheric variability is often described using proxy indices of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. We introduce new proxies derived from GNSS radio occultation (RO) satellite measurements. Using the high vertical resolution of the RO temperature fields we obtain altitude-resolved indices which can improve the description of atmospheric variability patterns and can be used in climate studies where a detailed knowledge of these patterns is required.

Hallgeir Wilhelmsen, Florian Ladstädter, Barbara Scherllin-Pirscher, and Andrea K. Steiner

Low-cost sensors promise neighborhood-scale air quality monitoring but have been plagued by inconsistent performance for precision, accuracy, and drift. CMU and SenSevere collaborated to develop the RAMP, which uses electrochemical sensors. We present a machine learning algorithm that overcomes previous performance issues and meets US EPA's data quality recommendations for personal exposure for NO2 and tougher "supplemental monitoring" standards for CO & ozone across 19 RAMPs for several months.

Naomi Zimmerman, Albert A. Presto, Sriniwasa P. N. Kumar, Jason Gu, Aliaksei Hauryliuk, Ellis S. Robinson, Allen L. Robinson, and R. Subramanian

Recent special issues

New observations and related modelling studies of the aerosol–cloud–climate system in the Southeast Atlantic and southern Africa regions (ACP/AMT inter-journal SI)
21 Jun 2018–31 May 2022 | Guest editors: J. M. Haywood, P. Zuidema, J. Schwarz, J. Riedi, M. Wendisch, P. Knippertz, and F. Eckardt | Information

The purpose of this special issue is the compilation of modelling and observational studies in connection with five international field deployments (AEROCLO-sA, CLARIFY, LASIC, ORACLES, and NaFoLiCA) that focus on the interactions of natural and anthropogenic aerosols with radiation, clouds, and regional climate in the South Atlantic Ocean and the southern African region. These deployments, based in Namibia, Ascension Island, and São Tomé, took place between 2016 and 2018 and support a significant number of investigations extending beyond just the individual science teams. The airborne and ground-based observations, as well as the related satellite measurements and climate modelling studies, address all aspects of aerosol–cloud–climate interactions, including the link of aerosol properties to meteorological fields and dynamical processes that influence aerosol emission and transport. The projects also target the advancement of remote sensing of aerosols for complex scenes over land, sea, and clouds. The special issue will be open to all submissions, with complementary goals to the five mentioned deployments, so as to encourage the exchange of ideas from inside and outside the science teams of all projects.

Fifth International Workshop on Ice Nucleation (FIN) (ACP/AMT inter-journal SI)
13 Jun 2018–31 Aug 2019 | Guest editors: A. K. Bertram, M. Krämer, B. Ervens, and D. Knopf | Information

We conducted the Fifth International Workshop on Ice Nucleation (FIN) to (1) understand the microphysics of how particles nucleate ice, (2) determine the number of ice forming particles as a function of atmospheric properties such as temperature and relative humidity, (3) measure the atmospheric distribution of ice forming particles and (4) ascertain the role of anthropogenic activities in producing or changing the behaviour of ice forming particles. To accomplish these goals we held three distinct workshops on the topic of atmospheric ice nucleation. The first was an intercomparison of instruments to determine the composition of ice forming particles in a controlled laboratory setting. This took place in autumn 2014 at the location of the last ice nucleation instrument intercomparison: the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The second was an intercomparison of instruments used to determine cloud formation conditions. This activity also took place at AIDA and was conducted in spring 2015. Because ice nucleation predominantly takes place at the low temperatures found at high altitude, a critical requirement for the third workshop was a facility that offers access to free-tropospheric air masses with minimal local particle sources. We used the Desert Research Institute’s recently renovated Storm Peak Laboratory for this workshop in autumn 2015.

Advances in cavity-based techniques for measurements of atmospheric aerosol and trace gases
25 May 2018–01 Nov 2018 | Guest editors: K. Manfred, P. Xie, W. Chen, D. S. Venables, and T. Hanisco | Information

This special issue aims to highlight advances in spectroscopic techniques for applications in atmospheric science. It will highlight cutting-edge measurements of atmospherically relevant species, including aerosol, isotopologues, and trace gases, using optical cavity-based techniques. Such techniques can include cavity-enhanced methods for sensitive absorption and extinction measurements as well as advances in frequency comb techniques. Techniques based on both broadband and laser sources from the ultraviolet to infrared will be considered. Papers based on both laboratory and field measurements are welcome.

Arctic mixed-phase clouds as studied during the ACLOUD/PASCAL campaigns in the framework of (AC)3
09 May 2018–31 Dec 2019 | Guest editors: J. Curtius, J. Kay, M. Shupe, J. Heintzenberg, A. Solomon, T. Vihma, V. Walden, and K. Law | Information

In this special issue papers resulting from two major combined field campaigns shall be aggregated: (i) the Arctic CLoud Observations Using airborne measurements during polar Day (ACLOUD), and (ii) the Physical feedbacks of Arctic boundary layer, Sea ice, Cloud and AerosoL (PASCAL). These two concurrent campaigns took place in the vicinity of Svalbard in May and June 2017. They were designed to study processes important for explaining Arctic amplification, and, in particular, for investigating the role of microphysical and dynamical properties of Arctic low- and mid-level, mixed-phase clouds, and their interactions with atmospheric radiation and aerosol particles. Ground-based, ship-borne, tethered balloon, aircraft, and satellite observations have been combined. The research vessel (RV) Polarstern, an ice floe camp (erected close to the icebreaker) including an instrumented tethered balloon, and the two research aircraft, Polar 5 and Polar 6, were jointly operated. Polar 5 served as a mobile remote sensing observatory looking at the clouds from above, whereas Polar 6 operated as a flying in situ measurement laboratory mostly sampling inside the clouds. The permanent ground station of Ny-Ålesund observed the clouds from below, applying similar but upward-looking remote sensing equipment as Polar 5. Some of the flights were performed underneath respective satellite tracks. In this special issue we compile a number of papers reporting about the results of the observations conducted during ACLOUD/PASCAL within the framework of the (AC)3 project (http://www.ac3-tr.de/).

Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean (ACP/AMT/GMD/HESS/NHESS/OS inter-journal SI)
01 Apr 2018–31 Dec 2021 | Guest editors: D. Cimini, G. T. Aronica, C. Barthlott, V. Kotroni, E. Martin, M. Meier, R. Moussa, K. Schroeder, H. Wernli, and V. Ducrocq | Information

The Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX, https://www.hymex.org/) programme is a 10-year concerted effort at the international level started in 2010 with aims to advance the understanding of the water cycle, and with emphases on the predictability and evolution of high-impact weather events, as well as on evaluating social vulnerability to these extreme events. The special issue is jointly organized between the Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, Ocean Science, Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, and Geoscientific Model Development journals. It aims at gathering contributions to the areas of understanding, modelling, and predicting at various timescales and spatial scales of the Mediterranean water cycle and its related extreme events, including cyclones, heavy precipitation, flash floods and impacts, drought and water resources, strong winds, and dense water formation. The special issue is not limited to studies conducted within HyMeX: any multiscale or multidisciplinary approaches related to the Mediterranean water cycle are encouraged.

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